Tag Archives: mobilemarketing

Mobile Marketing Budgets to Balloon in 2013

Budgets for mobile marketing will get bigger next year, according to a new study run by Strongmail and presented by eMarketer.

The study in question suggests that 70% of marketers will ramp up their mobile budgets in 2013.

“A lot of brands have spent far too much money on mobile applications,” Scott Forshay, a mobile and emerging technology strategist for emarketing company Acquity Group, tells Mashable.

The time for greater emphasis and financial backing on mobile marketing has finally come.

This year, mobile ad spending in the U.S. is expected to reach $2.6 billion. That includes spending on display, search and messaging-based formats. And another estimate shows mobile advertising on smartphones will be a $5.04 billion industry by 2015.

“Of that $2.6 billion spent, $2.5 [billion] of that was probably wasted,” Forshay admits. “Probably the biggest error brands have made as they venture into mobile is that they think mobile is the same thing they’re doing for the website, just down to a 4-inch form.”

“Mobile users are not tethered to a desktop. They need timely information to drive them into stores with positive purchase intent,” he says, adding that marketing on mobile devices “will need to be timely, personal and contextually relevant (people expect their phone to be customized to who they are), in order to work.”

Article Source: http://www.mobilemarketingwatch.com/mobile-marketing-budgets-to-balloon-in-2013-24180/

Leveraging Customer Feedback

No matter what type of business you’re in, you will always receive feedback from customers. Many businesses take the time to listen to customers and collect feedback, but not all know how to respond to that feedback and leverage it to better their business. It’s important to determine the proper protocol for responding to that feedback from customers.

With SMS marketing, the systems in place often allow businesses to receive text messages from customers with feedback. Customers will say exactly what is on their mind (not always good), and we must be monitoring these incoming comments for positive feedback!  Customers may leave feedback on other channels as well, for example by calling, emailing, posting on social media, etc.  Businesses should have a general understanding on how to manage their own PR and respond to and utilize those comments in the proper way.

I’ve outlined some strategies on how and when to respond to customer comments, as well as how we can leverage them:

What Messages to Respond to:

Positive Feedback

  • Obviously businesses can’t respond to EVERYONE who leaves positive feedback, so there’s really no need to respond.
  • Businesses can, however, show their appreciation for certain pieces of feedback (for example on social media) with a quick “Thanks for your feedback!”
  • Save positive comments to share with prospects.

Negative Feedback

  • Only respond if you can do it promptly–a delayed response may cause confusion. Responding to customer feedback 3 months later is pointless–the time has passed, the opportunity was missed.
  • Always offer to point the customer to your business’ customer service phone number.
  • In SMS marketing, if you receive an opt-out request:
    • No need to respond–simply delete that customer from the list.

When Responding to Feedback

  • Identify who you are.
  • Try to avoid ongoing dialog back and forth.
  • Address the need/question in one message, if possible.

Leveraging Positive Comments

  • Demonstrate customer demand for rewards.
  • Have a process in place to understand where customers could be finding problems in their dealings with your business.
  • Use screen shots from time to time to provide an element of value in your emails to your prospects.

Obtaining feedback is one thing, but knowing what to do with it AFTER you receive it, is what will really affect your business’ long term success. By embracing your customer feedback, you can achieve transparency into customer buying behavior and gain insight into future buying behavior.

Why is SMS Not Playing a Bigger Role in Brands’ Marketing Efforts?

Macy's SMS

When it comes to mobile marketing, SMS is a trusted old friend – it has been around longer than other mobile marketing techniques, has a broad reach and, for a well-executed campaign, the results can be impressive. So why do many marketers still overlook SMS?

Part of the problem is image – SMS is often closely associated with feature phones and, therefore, bypassed when brands start thinking about smartphones. There are other issues such as difficulties getting short codes and the need to work with carriers, but with open rates of nearly 100 percent, some big marketers such as Dunkin’ Donuts and McDonald’s are beginning to take notice.

“SMS is an overlooked channel,” said Julie Roth Novack, senior vice president of mobile solutions at Vibes. “It went out of favor a year or two ago with the growth in smartphones.

“In people’s minds, SMS is connected with feature phones but the fact of the matter is SMS is the No. 1 app on smartphones,” she said. “There is this idea that because you are going after smartphone users, you don’t need SMS.

“We have really seen a shift in the past six months, with our retail partners saying that SMS is a critical part of their strategy.”

Short codes a challenge
SMS service providers agree that it has not reached its potential as a marketing technique, often because marketers get so excited about the richer experiences they can deliver via apps and the mobile Web.

There are other challenges, too, such as that marketers need to have a better understanding of how SMS can fit into a broad mobile strategy. Additionally, a certain level of expertise is required to set up an SMS program to insure that the permissions are structured properly and to understand how to work with the wireless carriers.

Perhaps of the biggest challenges are the short codes used in SMS campaigns. Typically, a mobile phone user is asked to text a keyword to a short code initiate a dialogue of some kind with a marketer.

“One of the largest hurdles for brands wanting to leverage SMS marketing is understanding and dealing with the short code process,” said Jared Reitzin, CEO of mobileStorm, Los Angeles. “Since SMS relies on the use of shared or dedicated short codes, brands have to wade through the confusion, ambiguity and complication of short code setup, provisioning, regulation and best practices.

“Until these processes are simplified and made much more affordable, brands will continue to skip SMS as a viable marketing channel,” he said. “Broader use of SMS marketing will come when the barrier of entry is lowered substantially in terms of acquiring and using short codes, in addition to regulatory scrutiny for not only large organizations, but small businesses as well.”

SMS success
In addition to these challenges, marketers often do not know how to market via SMS because of the limited character count and lack of rich media. However, increasingly marketers are understanding that SMS, with its immediacy, broad reach and high open rates, can be an important way to drive users to richer app and mobile Web experiences.

“Through its inherent limitations with character-count and lack of rich media, SMS is better used as a contact point to drive engagement to other relevant channels, rather than being used exclusively to drive a specific action,” Mr. Reitzin said. “The primary benefits of SMS are the immediacy, the nearly ubiquitous reach, and the nearly 100 percent open rate.

“Using these attributes to drive traffic to more engaging channels like the mobile Web or mobile apps is where it’s true power lies,” he said. “Until marketers understand this formula, its full potential will never be fully realized.

The examples of SMS’ success are numerous and growing.

For example, Dunkin Donuts recently sent 7,500 mobile coupons via SMS that offered a latte for $.99, per Mr. Reiztin. The brand supported the SMS call-to-action through local radio mentions and WAP targeting on local-interest sites.

The promotion increased in-store traffic 21 percent and a full 17 percent of participants forwarded or showed the message to a friend for the all-important viral effect.

“The potential for SMS growth has still not reached its apex,” said Jeff Hasen, chief marketing officer of Hipcricket, Kirkland, WA.

“Companies need to have an understanding of their customers’ desires and needs from a marketing perspective,” he said. “SMS isn’t for every brand and that baseline user knowledge is the first step to a successful mobile campaign.

“SMS campaigns are an excellent way to engage with consumers, offering a call-to-action that they can’t pass up. Marketers that can go the next step by making their SMS campaigns relevant and local will see a greater response and return on investment.”

Article Source: http://www.mobilemarketer.com/cms/news/messaging/13218.html

Successful Loyalty Programs vs. New Groupon Rewards Program

The “loyalty” aspect of our service is what has really fueled a lot of the interest we’ve been getting recently. There has been a huge spike in interest in SMS and other mobile marketing services since the beginning of 2012. And, for the past few years, the Groupon model has been relatively popular. The concept of social buying and heavy discounts was very compelling to small businesses that were looking for ways to drive business. However, we saw some backlash with this model.

The deep discounts and one-time buys are not ideal for the goals and needs of certain businesses. I’ve seen about 60-90% of business owners say they will never do another Groupon again. So if you look at the business market and see that most businesses will not use Groupon again, then how does Groupon have any kind of future?

We always knew that the No. 1 fail point of Groupon was that they had no client retention model. We knew they would eventually have to evolve into a loyalty company—and they did when they came out with Groupon Rewards.

Now, the company is distancing itself from small businesses. They realized their model failed to deliver loyalty, so they started offering a lot of other type of products. Now their focus is on “rewards”, which they obviously did out of demand in the marketplace. But, many businesses dislike Groupon because although they can offer great discounts to customers, they aren’t able to get their hands on the list of people who bought the Groupon. That list is important in building loyalty and personal, engaging interactions among customers.

At SMS Masterminds, we have taken the time and energy to build a very campaign-based and service-based program. We understand the concept of loyalty and how it relates to the needs and opportunities of small business marketing.

There are several elements of a loyalty program that absolutely must be included for the program to be successful. And guess what—Groupon has incorporated virtually none of them. Here are some of the must-have components to a successful loyalty program:

Personal Relationship Building

Whatever system you use for your loyalty program should be one that rides the trends of the loyalty marketing industry and the demands of consumers. Consumers are demanding relationships—they want to feel important and buy from people that they like. If a brand can create a personality and get people to like it, that brand will win over customers. It’s about making an effort to make the customer experience personal and engaging.

Engaging Ongoing Messaging

A loyalty program needs to have consistency in its touch points. We are in a very fast-paced industry today and people expect instant gratification. With our loyalty marketing program, consumers are constantly engaged—receiving text message updates and rewards for checking-in on the Loyalty Rewards Kiosk. With Groupon Rewards, there is no engagement. It’s a system that tallies up totals, and who knows when you will receive your reward.

Timely Push Technology

You want to be able to PUSH your message out there. In order to continue that personal relationship with consumers, you must be able to reach them and provide them with something of value. Push technology is so important in marketing—and that’s why mobile is so big right now—because being able to push out your message and almost INSTANTLY reach consumers is unbelievably powerful.

In-House Engagement Element

You need to have something in-house that people can engage with when they walk into your business. There needs to be something they can do, touch, see, feel—whether it’s a table tent or some other form of signage or a Loyalty Rewards Kiosk conveniently located at the point of purchase—so customers can see, in that moment, how many check-ins they have so far, how many rewards they’ve earned, etc.

Habit Forming Consumer Use

A loyalty system needs to teach your customer how to buy. A successful program can help them develop habits that they will continue to act on over time. Consumer buyer habits are one of the most critical elements of any analytics because understanding what your customers are doing and helping them further mold their buying habits will directly affect your bottom line.

Social Media Integration

It’s 2012. If you are still aboard the anti-social media “I don’t see how it will help my business” train, then you should probably get off at the next stop. You can no longer turn a blind eye. Social media is out there, it’s big, and you can’t deny the success that many businesses have using it to promote brand awareness. A system with elements of loyalty, brand building and consumer engagement should absolutely include social media to round off the entire experience.

If you’re in the marketing industry, you’re going to have people ask you about the differences between Groupon and other loyalty marketing programs. Be prepared to answer those kind of questions by being informed.

Anyone can buy a full-page advertisement in a newspaper, but it’s what the ad says and how it looks that makes the difference of whether it works or not. It comes down to service. When we see other companies providing a technology-only solution, it comes up short in terms of what expectations should be. Value is the key, which is why our system has been built the way it has and how it has remained sustainable among all the other variations that are out there.

Restaurant Industry Is Leading the Pack in Mobile Adoption [INFOGRAPHIC]

The restaurant and food industry is embracing the mobile movement more than other business sectors, according to a new infographic.

DudaMobile, a service that makes websites mobile ready, found that restaurants and food services from pizzerias and bakeries to food trucks take 28% of the total percentage of small to medium-sized businesses that have a mobile-friendly site.

This category is far more advanced than other industries looking to reach out to smartphone users, including professional services such as locksmiths and attorneys (16%), health and wellness including spas and salons (10%), travel and tourism such as hotels (8%) and automobile/transportation (6%). Retailer was number six on the list (5%) for small to medium-sized businesses.

DudaMobile also noted that nearly 20% of visits to a mobile-optimized website result in an immediate call to the business.

The infographic also noted that 70% of smartphone owners use their device while shopping. In addition, about 51% of business travelers use mobile devices to find out information while on the go.

For a full look at which industries are embracing mobile, check out the infographic below.

Article Source: http://mashable.com/2012/06/14/mobile-adoption/

5 Mobile Marketing Questions Every Business Owner Needs Answered

Everywhere you look, people are on their smartphones — but many aren’t talking. They’re browsing, texting and using apps, which makes them a tempting target for marketers.

According to communication technologies agency the International Communication Union, there are now 5.9 billion users of smartphones and other mobile devices, representing 87 percent of the world’s population. The ICU also reports that 1.5 billion people are using the mobile web.

That’s a huge business opportunity. But where do you start? Here is some insight on five mobile marketing questions every business owner wants answered.

1. Should I build a mobile website or a mobile app?
Most businesses will want to build or optimize their websites for mobile rather than build an application. Think of the fundamental reasons your customers would visit your website, especially if they’re on the go. Make sure that on a phone or tablet screen your site’s navigation is easy to use, there’s no need for unnecessary zooming or scrolling, and the main things your audience wants are easy to locate.

One of my favorite examples of a great mobile website is PapaJohns.com. There are three big buttons — order a pizza for delivery, order a pizza for pick-up and find a location. If you want something else, go to the website on a computer, not a phone.

2. When does a smartphone app make sense?
Apps don’t replace your mobile website. They supplement your audience’s experience. Some businesses — especially media outlets or those with a high volume of original content, such as blog posts or videos — may be able to develop a useful service via an app.

New York’s Mermaid Oyster Bar includes its menu, locations, hours and a reservation link on its mobile-optimized website, along with a button to install its Oysterpedia application. The app is a companion encyclopedia of all things oyster, including photos and descriptions of the many varieties. It lets users bookmark their favorite oysters and share information with their social networks.

The app is subtle. It doesn’t directly ask people to visit the brick-and-mortar location, but it certainly establishes the restaurant as an authority. And where would you prefer to dine on oysters? Where the authority prepares them, of course.

3. What is responsive design and should I invest in it?
Responsive design is a relatively new approach to web design and development that essentially bakes in mobile optimization to your website rather than your having to create multiple site designs. Think of it as having one website rather than three — one for the desktop browser, one for a tablet and one for a phone.

Some content management systems and blog themes are emerging that incorporate responsive design. Also, many developers are building new websites with responsive design techniques in mind. So, responsive design can be had for minimal investment if you’re using WordPress or a similar open-source content management system.

4. What are QR Codes and how can I use them?
QR, or quick response, codes are basically bar codes that serve as a link to send a phone’s browser to a web address. Users scan the code with a QR code reader they have downloaded to their phones.

You can use QR codes to deliver coupons, get customers to register for your email newsletter, or even send them to “Like” you on Facebook. But be sure to make the QR process simple and efficient. The web address you send people to should be optimized for mobile, and you should include instructions on using the code for newbies.

Just over 6 percent of U.S. mobile users had scanned a QR code as of mid-2011, according to digital analytics service comScore, Inc. So, the market penetration is small. But the adoption of QR use has grown exponentially since the bar codes hit the U.S. market in the mid-2000s.

5. How close are we to mobile commerce?
Depending on your definition, we’re already mobile-commerce ready with existing technology. Not only do mobile hardware accessories such as Square provide credit card readers that plug into your mobile devices, but platforms including Flint Mobile also remove the hardware requirement by using your phone’s camera to scan the credit card number.

But other products such as Google Wallet, which incorporate Near Field Communications — a far more secure radio communication from a device like your phone to another device such as a cash register — are still in limited testing phases. The carrier, device and operating system companies have yet to agree on industry standards for security and privacy protection. So you’re not likely to see people waving cell phones in front of your credit card readers in the near future. Still, keep an eye on Google Wallet and other mobile commerce developments.

We have answered some of the basic questions, but there’s a lot more to know about mobile marketing before you dive in. Helpful online resources include Google’s HowToGoMo.com and the site mobithinking.com, which includes many statistics and insights.

Article Source: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/223711

Making Sense of Mobile Marketing

The versatility of mobile as a marketing tool is one of its biggest assets. Arguably, also, one of its biggest problems – for a new brand coming to the mobile channel new, there’s so much you can do that the problem is knowing what you should do.

Think about the modern day mobile phone for a moment and, in particular, the differences between a smartphone and a PC. On the down side, the phone has a smaller screen, so whatever you do in marketing terms to a PC audience, you can’t simply assume you can do the same stuff on a mobile.

Then think about all the advantages the mobile phone holds over the PC. The first and most obvious one is that we all tend to take our phones with us wherever we go. If we see something out on the street with a call to action, such as a shortcode (a five-digit number often seen on outdoor posters) or a QR code, we can use the mobile to react instantly to that piece of marketing

Then think about the phone’s camera. Naturally, this enables the user to take still or moving images but, allied to an augmented reality app, it can serve up a totally different view of the world, one which can tell the user what’s going on around them at that moment, simply by holding up the phone in front of them.

And because the modern smartphone knows not only where you are, but which way you are pointing, you only have to turn around with the phone in front of you to see what’s going on in the other or opposite direction.

So if you’re in the business of selling houses, for example, you could create an augmented reality app which lets the user see which houses are for sale around them, simply by holding the phone in front of them. It’s something the online estate agent Findaproperty.com has already done.

Now put yourself in the shoes of a marketing director for a big brand which has got its online act together, is active on Facebook and Twitter, but has not yet got to grips with this mobile thing.

Where do you start to make sense of the marketing opportunities it presents? And how do you avoid being blinded by the technology and producing something you think is very clever, but which offers little value to your customers?

Well I think a good place to start is with those customers. Ask them what services you could serve up to their mobile phone that would be of some value or utility to them. For a retailer, it could be an app or a mobile site that enables customers to buy from you whenever they have a couple of minutes to kill. Many retailers, in fact, have gone down this route.

It could be a way of locating your nearest retail outlet, branch, cash machine or post box, and finding out about any special offers that you are running at that moment – it could simply be a way of keeping up to date about the latest news from the brand.

In the early days of mobile marketing, following the launch of the iPhone in 2007, and the Apple App Store the following year – actually, mobile geeks will know the early days were actually around the year 2000, but 2007 is when it really started to gain some momentum – most brands’ answer to the question: “What should we be doing on mobile?” was: “We should be doing an iPhone app.”

Today, thankfully, things have moved on. While an app may indeed be the answer for many brands, offering, as it does, the opportunity for a deep, rich engagement with their customers, most are taking a bit more time to examine the question in greater detail.

This, indeed, is why the mobile marketing business is experiencing such rapid growth; marketers and budget holders are realising there is so much more to the world of mobile marketing than apps.

Many are taking a more rounded, holistic approach that embraces apps, but also, mobile-optimised sites, mobile advertising, mobile coupons and tickets, location-based services, and customer relationship management programs based around mobile messaging to customers who have given their permission for the brand to send messages to their mobile phone. At the last count, Marks & Spencer had more than 1 million customers opted in to its mobile database.

Those brands that got in early are now reaping the rewards, having learned what works and what doesn’t, while most mobile marketing activity was well away from the public glare. Those joining the party late are at least joining the party, driven by the results their peers have experienced on mobile, and are now shouting about.

Marks & Spencer has been shouting louder than most. Last year, it revealed it had taken an order for more than £5,000 for kitchen units via its mobile-optimised site. More recently, in May 2012, it reported that its revenues from mobile had increased by 300% over the past 12 months.

In May last year, Domino’s Pizza revealed that it had taken £10m in orders though its mobile properties, including apps and a mobile-optimised site. Then in October, it announced that it had taken £130,000 in orders through mobile devices in a single day.

These are figures that are hard to ignore, and they are helping marketers overcome one of the biggest challenges they face with any new channel – securing the budget to try it out.

As more success stories emerge, and more funds are released, so more brands are embracing mobile, recognising its unique power as a one-to-one communication channel, with the important proviso that before it is used for any direct communication, such as a text message sent to a customer, for example, it is vital that the customer’s permission is sought and obtained.

At Mobile Marketing Live on 1-2 October at the Business Design Centre in London, we will be exploring the challenges and opportunities presented by the mobile channel in more detail. Leading brands such as the Guardian, Barclaycard, Debenhams and Domino’s will discuss their experiences using mobile marketing. If you’re trying to move from what you could do on mobile, to what you should do on mobile, it’s a great place to start.

Article Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media-network/media-network-blog/2012/jun/06/mobile-marketing-retail?newsfeed=true

How to Attract Local Customers Using Mobile

Are you using mobile to reach customers in a specific location?

Location-based advertising is nothing new, but mobile has brought it to an entirely different level and the numbers tell the story: BIA/Kelsey predicts explosive growth for mobile local advertising over the next four years, from $784 million in 2011 to $5.01 billion in 2016!

So if it’s local customers you’re after, check out these recommendations for reaching them with mobile:

1. Build a mobile site.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, I’m going to list this as the first step, with the key benefit being discoverability. A customer looking for a shoe repair shop in his area is most likely going to plug those keywords and a city name into Google. Make sure your business can be found and deliver an experience that is optimized for mobile.

If you need help getting started, check out How to Build a Mobile Website.

2. Optimize for search engines.

As with your desktop site, search engine optimization (SEO) is a mobile must-have. However, mobile is different – searches tend to be task-oriented and location-specific. Cindy Krum from Mobile Moxie suggests the following in an article from Bluetrain Mobile:

  • Set up proper device detection and redirection to your mobile site.
  • Optimize meta data (title tags, alt tags, etc.).
  • Spend some time on local SEO, meaning get your business information listed in local search tools like Google Places and Yelp.

3. Invest in paid search.

Last year, Google released a study showing that 89% of paid search clicks are incremental to those from organic search, meaning that they would be lost if a paid search campaign were stopped.

Don’t neglect this powerful tool for driving local mobile traffic. Google offers a number of mobile-specific ad formats, some of which are tailor-made for local searches (“Location Extensions” or “Ads with Offers,” for example).

4. Run a mobile display campaign.

Mobile display affords marketers almost limitless targeting capabilities. Aiming for the businessperson contemplating lunch in her area? Run a campaign targeted to business publications, from 11am – 2pm, targeted to a specific city or zip code. Just don’t refine too much or you won’t have an audience!

Check out iMedia Connection’s guide to mobile display advertising, then start by running a campaign with a self-service ad network like mMedia or Jumptap.

5. Combine geofencing and SMS.

We’ve sung the praises of SMS here before. When combined with geofencing, which is the practice of creating virtual fences around locations like stores or offices, the result is very powerful. A user could enter a geofence around your store and receive an exclusive SMS coupon!

It is especially important to develop a geofencing campaign that is relevant to individual customers, doesn’t message too often and respects privacy. Consider Placecast and iLoop for such an initiative.

Mobile presents marketers with new ways to reach local customers more effectively than ever before. Today, pick one of the tactics above, contact a vendor or your agency and get started today!

Article Source: http://60secondmarketer.com/blog/2012/06/06/how-to-attract-local-customers-using-mobile/

Reaching the Right Audience with Mobile

Today, smartphones allow businesses to better reach their target audiences. The ubiquitous nature of mobile helps brand engage with consumers in real-time, unlike any other marketing channel before.

But reaching your audience on mobile requires a different strategy than reaching your audience through other mediums, so it’s important to recognize the differences and plan your campaigns accordingly.

Businesses can reach their mobile audience through a number of ways, including standalone mobile apps, text messaging, mobile-optimized websites, mobile display ads and more.

I recently participated in a Mobile Marketing Association webinar titled, Reaching the Right Audience Through Mobile & Social Media. The webinar panel featured Michael Becker, Managing Director, North America, MMA and speaker representatives from airG, one of the world’s largest mobile social media products.

As noted by the airG executives, some of the core advantage of mobile are relevancy, scale and the ability to control the who, what, when and how of their message.

Mobile is relevant because it’s about capturing the right audience with the right message at the right time. Providing consumers with relevancy in terms of content or location is very powerful.

The scale is impeccable. There are 1.2 billion mobile Web users and 5.9 billion mobile subscribers worldwide.  The global penetration of mobile devices continues to skyrocket, and thus the opportunity is constantly growing for marketers.

Another benefit of mobile is the ability to control your message content, the recipients, the time and the method. You can target mobile users by demographic, location and interests, and control their engagement and interaction.

With that being said, to reach the right audience through mobile there are a few things your brand should do. First, know your campaign goal. What is the desired outcome of your marketing or advertising efforts? Identify the audience you are trying to reach!

Next, target core prospects—not everyone. Don’t waste your time throwing your message out to everyone when, in reality, you only want certain ones to see it.

Lastly, run your campaign and measure the results. The only way you will know if it worked is to analyze the metrics. Know what success looks like and don’t accept anything less.

How to Grow Your Mobile Subscriber List

Are you looking for ways to increase the size of your SMS marketing list?

SMS may not be the shiniest tool in your mobile marketing kit, but its immediacy, high reach and strong engagement make it hard to beat. In a recent study of 1,180 national retailers, Cellit found that SMS produced engagement rates that were 6-8 times higher than the expected norms!

Perhaps you’re finding the first step – building a subscriber list – to be the toughest one, or you would like to increase the size of your existing list. Check out these tips for gathering mobile opt-ins:

1. Target your existing fans.

It’s likely that you already have some avid supporters out there – on Facebook, Twitter or maybe those that subscribe to your email newsletter. Since this group has already shown a willingness to communicate with you, this is where you should start your acquisition efforts. Try adding a custom form to your Facebook page or a strong call-to-action to your emails.

2. Incentivize.

A good reason for customers to sign up for your text alerts is so that they can receive offers or discounts. What better way to encourage sign-up than to offer them something in exchange?

Just remember to make the offer enticing and relevant to your business. A dentist’s office could probably gain a few subscribers by giving away movie tickets, but those subscribers may only be interested in the tickets – 20% off of a cleaning would be more appropriate.

3. Go offline.

Signing up for SMS alerts is quick, easy, and can be done from almost anywhere, so there’s no reason to limit your acquisition efforts to mobile or online channels. Consider adding your short code and keyword to in-store displays, receipts, print ads, direct mail, product packaging and out-of-home ads.

4. Make it simple.

Correction: signing up for SMS alerts can be easy, as long as marketers follow a few best practices. Mobile Marketing Watch published some great tips regarding keyword selection – generally, it’s best to pick a short, single word that’s easy to remember. Very important: test to see what a device’s auto-correct does to the keyword you’ve selected!

One trick to avoid typing issues is giving customers the option to scan a QR code that generates a text message with the correct keyword. However, in your promotional material, make sure you display the keyword and short code alongside it for feature phone users.

5. Deliver good content.

If you’re not providing information or offers that your audience finds useful, you’ll lose the subscribers you have and discourage new sign-ups.

When possible, personalize your messaging with user-specific information like location, preference or purchase history. Also, make sure that you’re not messaging too seldom or too often – start with 2-4 messages per month and adjust based on user response.

Article Source

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